Coronavirus Update

Coronavirus Commission Update
July 26, 2022

Mobile County is once again in the High-Risk Category for transmission of COVID-19, especially the most recent Omicron BA.5 variant. With this in mind, we are encouraged to remain mindful of the ongoing situation and to follow applicable health recommendations from sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Mobile County Health Department.
Vaccines and Boosters
Having an up-to-date vaccination is the MOST effective way to mitigate the transmission of the disease, to protect yourself and others, and to lessen the severity of the disease if you do get a break-through case. Please see information at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Alabama Department of Public Health (ADPH) and the Mobile County Health Department (MCHD) regarding currently recommended vaccines and boosters.

Vaccinations are readily available at local pharmacies, the Health Department, and some clinics. The CDC, ADPH and MCHD all have websites (see above for links) that help identify local sites that offer vaccinations and boosters.
Masks and other safety protocols

  • Our church remains a mask-friendly congregation. We encourage you to wear a mask if you are in a high-risk category or are in close contact with an individual in the high-risk category.
  • If you do wear a mask, it is important to have a well-fitting mask that covers your mouth and nose. Here is a link to the CDC guidance on masks.

Testing

  • You can get FREE COVID-19 tests delivered to your house through the US Postal Service.
  • Although these rapid antigen tests are less reliable than laboratory PCR tests, they can be helpful in identifying positive cases. It is good to get an at-home test kit when you’re well, so it will be handy if you need it.
  • Even if you think you are just experiencing your usual allergy symptoms, taking an at-home rapid antigen test to confirm whether you are positive or not may prevent you from unknowingly spreading COVID to others.

If you test POSITIVE

Check with your health care provider regarding available treatment if you are immunocompromised or in a high-risk category.

CDC recommendations:

  • If you had COVID-19 and had symptoms, isolate for at least 5 days. To calculate your 5-day isolation period, day 0 is your first day of symptoms. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed. You can leave isolation after 5 full days.
  • You can end isolation after 5 full days if you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication and your other symptoms have improved (Loss of taste and smell may persist for weeks or months after recovery and need not delay the end of isolation).
  • You should continue to wear a well-fitting mask around others at home and in public for 5 additional days (day 6 through day 10) after the end of your 5-day isolation period. If you are unable to wear a mask when around others, you should continue to isolate for a full 10 days. Avoid people who have weakened immune systems or are more likely to get very sick from COVID 19, and nursing homes and other high-risk settings, until after at least 10 days.
  • If you continue to have fever or your other symptoms have not improved after 5 days of isolation, you should wait to end your isolation until you are fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medication and your other symptoms have improved. Continue to wear a well-fitting mask through day 10. Contact your healthcare provider if you have questions.
  • See additional CDC information about travel.
  • Do not go to places where you are unable to wear a mask, such as restaurants and some gyms, and avoid eating around others at home and at work until a full 10 days after your first day of symptoms.
  • If you tested positive and had no symptoms, you can end isolation after 5 days and continue wearing mask in public for 10 days.

o See more information at the CDC, ADPH and MCHD: